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Alumni Eyes on Campus

What made you decide to work at PD?

Amy Wollin Glosson ’92 “PD has always been home to me. I have wonderful memories of growing up in the halls of Williams Building and Overcash Hall, playing kickball on the front field, and being served lunch by our volunteer moms in what is now the World Language wing of Providence Hall. When asked about PD memories, I recall class trips, state championships, college tours, dances, and SGA retreats. It really is the people and the experiences that make this school such a special place. I came back to teach at Providence Day because I wanted to continue to be a part of this amazing community that helped nurture and guide me throughout my youth. I returned to PD as a TK assistant in 2012 with my own children in Lower School. Watching them grow and learn alongside their peers, be challenged daily by their teachers, and enjoy the process of learning makes me so thankful to be a Charger.”

Kristin Foster Santo ’94 “I am now in my 4th year back at PD. I came both personally and professionally. I wanted to give my daughter the same amazing opportunities I was granted as a student here--the close relationship with teachers, the opportunities to try new sports and clubs, and to push myself academically. Professionally, I wanted to be in a place where I feel valued by my peers, where I know I can make a difference. My students can truly be change makers – they have access to the means of change, and I want to help inspire them to be their best selves, in and out of the classroom.”

Jill Ingram ’04 “Providence Day has always felt like home for me. Once I found my passion for teaching in Florida, I knew that I wanted to continue my career in teaching at PD. There were so many teachers from Providence Day that influenced me in such a positive way, and I wanted to do the same for the students of this community.”

Courtney Patterson Inscoe ’06 “I respected my teachers so much when I was a student here, and after becoming a teacher myself, I had a whole new appreciation for them. Having the chance to be colleagues with my former teachers and continue to learn from them seemed like a wonderful opportunity!”

Lucy Stickler ’08 “I loved my teachers when I was a student at PD. When I was considering becoming a teacher, the faculty at PD were who I wanted to be. As I was looking for jobs, I knew I would jump at the chance to work with these people who had first inspired my love of learning. When the opportunity arose five years ago, I was so excited. I remember when Eric Hedinger called me to say I got the job, he said ‘welcome home’ and it really does feel like coming home.”

Carlisa Warner ’10 “Honestly, it has always been a dream of mine to work at PD, even when I was a Lower School student. It is my home away from home and my second family. When I was a student, I would always start my school year by visiting teachers I had in previous years. We would share stories, reminisce, laugh, and discuss the future. I remember expressing to Mrs. Hovis, my former TK teacher, that I wanted to be a TK teacher just like her one day. Now, I am working in my former TK classroom, which is currently the TK Cottage, as a TK teacher – just like her! Providence Day is truly a special place, and I am so thankful to go to work at my other home, with my second family.”

How does being an alum impact your job?

Amy Field Bynum ’88 “I feel a huge responsibility to live up to the legacy of the teachers that impacted my education. I love having some of my former teachers as colleagues, though it is still difficult to call them by their first names.” Lynn

Lewis Mayhew ’92 “It gives me an automatic sense of pride for the PD community since I've called this place home since I started in first grade. Working here makes me feel proud, safe, and loved.”

Stephanie Eichenbrenner Vanderford ’95 “Even though I was a PD student 25 years ago, I feel like I can understand firsthand a lot of what PD students experience, especially the academic demands.”

Ben Hovis ’96 “It impacts my teaching a great deal as I started as a PD student in 4th grade and now teach 4th grade. It was a rough year for me transitioning to a new school and a new neighborhood. From a coaching standpoint, it's all about pride! The track and cross country coaches and programs helped raise me into who I am today, and I simply want to carry on those ideas year after year. Coach Murdock was like a second father to me coming through Middle School and Upper School. I hope that my athletes know I genuinely care about them just as he did for all of his athletes many years ago.”

Steve Bondurant ’98 “As the Director of Alumni Relations it has a huge impact! As a fellow alum, I can relate to the alumni and have a good understanding of what they want to hear about the school and the types of events and programming they may want to see. Since we are one big family, I believe that being an alum gives me an instant connection with the alumni I reach out to and they know I have walked in their shoes before.”

Laura Hunter Martin ’99 “I'm able to connect with the kids on a better level having been where they are. They love asking questions about what PD was like ‘long ago’ and hearing stories.”

What has changed the most at PD since your time as a student?

Leigh Dyer ’88 “I know lots of people will probably say it's the physical campus, and that is certainly almost unrecognizable, but for me the difference I appreciate the most is how much more diverse we are, and – not to use a cliché, but it really applies to us – how much more global our school truly is. I'm very proud to be associated with this school!”

Brian Field ’94 “The size of the student body and the building of state-of-the-art buildings is the biggest physical change. However, the heartbeat of our community has not changed – it is still a place that feels and acts like a family, despite its growth.”

Lee Tappy ’94 “It’s easy to see the biggest changes here since the 90s, when I was in Upper School. Obviously, the sizes of the graduating classes are significantly larger – ours was 56 – and the major changes to the campus make it hard to recognize for classmates who return to visit. However, what is most impressive in the face of this exponential growth is what has NOT changed – the sense of family, of community, and the overwhelming feeling of belonging in such an amazing place. It’s a school where everything seems to continually evolve, yet still, somehow, it manages to remain true to who we have always been.”

Michelle Garrity ’04 “The landscape of the campus has changed the most since my time as a student. Even while I was a student, there were already big additions like the library, DicksonHemby Technology building, Mosack Athletic Center, and tennis courts. When I started as a teacher here, I was introduced to the West Wing (we had the relos when I was a student), Fine Arts Center expansion, and Dining Hall renovations. Today, I have been able to see a new Head of School House, stadium/track/stands combination, Academic Center, Demayo Gateway Center, and parking deck be built. Though the campus has added new buildings and renovated others, the one thing that hasn't changed is the community of students, parents, teachers, and staff that live under it.”

Mahari Conston Freeman ’12 “PD has changed so much since I was a student! The campus is even more beautiful with the new stadium, the Gateway Center, Global Cafe, etc. Also, the fact that the West Wing is gone! Another thing that has changed is the dress code and I think it’s awesome that students and faculty can now show Charger spirit every Friday. With that said, PD is still the same supportive community that it’s always been and I’m so happy to be back!”

  • Alumni Stories
  • Issue 1
  • Providence Day Magazine
  • Sara Riggsby
  • Volume 5